Welcome!

The Paleoanthropology Society was founded in 1992. It recognizes that paleoanthropology is multidisciplinary in nature and the organization's central goal is to bring together physical anthropologists, archaeologists, paleontologists, geologists and a range of other researchers whose work has the potential to shed light on hominid behavioral and biological evolution.

Statement on Sexual Harassment and Assault

The Paleoanthropology Society is committed to providing a safe space, free of threats, harassment or assault, to all of our members regardless of age, ethnicity, race, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, disabilities, religion, marital status, or any other reason unrelated to professional performance. In this document, the concept of Paleoanthropology Society "member" includes both dues-paying and non-paying recipients of Society mailings.

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The Time is Now  - A message from Paleoanthropology Society Members Bill Kimbel and Kaye Reed.

News & Announcements


Junior Scientist Position in Luminescence Dating

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Leipzig, Germany

The Department of Human Evolution of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig (Germany), invites applications for a post-doctoral position in luminescence dating. In the Department, palaeoanthropological research is conducted within a multidisciplinary environment involving groups of scientists including biological anthropologists, Palaeolithic archaeologists, archaeological scientists, and geochronologists. Luminescence dating forms a significant component of the geochronology group (integrating radiocarbon, U-series and luminescence dating) with a well-equipped laboratory. More information about the Department and the luminescence lab can be found on our web site.

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Postdoctoral Position at the Research Centre of Human Evolution, Griffith University

The Research Centre of Human Evolution (RCHE) is the first academic centre specifically focused on gaining a deeper understanding of the scale of ancient human migrations and the full story of the origins of the people in our region. An initiative of Queensland’s Griffith University, RCHE’s mission is to foster research excellence through multidisciplinary projects that bring together leading Australian and international scholars and institutions in the field of human evolution, with a particular focus on two key regions: Australia and neighboring Southeast Asia.

A new three year research fellow position at level 1 or 2 dependent on qualifications, skills and experience has been established to attract an outstanding candidate in any of RCHE's research themes: Archaeogeochemistry and Geochronology, Archaeology of SE Asia, Genomics, Landscape and Human Co- evolution, Palaeoanthropology, and Rock Art Research.

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Challenges and Opportunities for Human Evolution research in SE Asia and Australasia

Griffith University, Research Centre of Human Evolution
8th - 9th July 2016, Australia

The symposium is linked to the official launch of the Research Centre of Human Evolution at Griffith University. The symposium reviews the current research on human evolution research in SE Asia and Australasia and provides a platform to develop research synergies between Australian researchers, colleagues from SE Asia, and overseas. Invited speakers include Prof François Sémah, Paris; Prof Chris Stringer, London; Prof Eske Willerslev (Copenhagen).

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Doctoral Student Position in Isotope Zooarchaeology at the Max Planck Institute

The Department of Human Evolution of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig (Germany), invites applications for a doctoral candidate position (PhD) focusing on isotopic analysis of zooarchaeological remains from Palaeolithic sites. In the Department, palaeoanthropological research is conducted within a multidisciplinary environment involving groups of scientists including biological anthropologists, Palaeolithic archaeologists, archaeological scientists, and geochronologists. Isotope mass spectrometry forms a significant component of the archaeological sciences group with a well-equipped laboratory. More information about the Department and the labs can be found on our web site.

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Swartkrans Field School

Experience Paleoanthropology in South Africa
(June 15 – July 15, 2016)

The Swartkrans Cave site (https://www.studyabroad.wisc.edu/programs/program.asp?program_id=246) has provided the:

  • Largest sample (> 126 individuals) of Paranthropus robustus in the world
  • First evidence for the co-existence of two different hominin lineages
    • Homo erectus (direct ancestor of modern humans)
    • Paranthropus robustus (extinct “cousin” of the genus Homo)
  • First and earliest evidence for controlled use of fire found anywhere c. 1.0 million years ago
  • First and earliest evidence of tool use with non-stone material (i.e. bone tools) c. 2.0 million years ago

This four-week program offers you the opportunity to participate in a paleoanthropology fieldschool at the famous fossil human locality of Swartkrans, South Africa (http://swartkrans.org/). Swartkrans, a cave site approximately twenty miles from Johannesburg, is recognized as one of the world's most important archaeological and fossil localities for the study of human evolution, and is part of the “Cradle of Humankind” World Heritage Site (http://www.gauteng.net/cradleofhumankind). The site's geological deposits span millions of years and sample several important events in human evolution. The oldest finds at the site date between 2.0 and 1.0 million years old-a time period during which our immediate ancestor, Homo erectus, shared the landscape with the extinct ape-man species Paranthropus robustus. In addition to fossils of these species, Swartkrans also preserves an abundant archaeological record of their behavior in the form of stone and bone tools, as well as butchered animal bones. Most spectacularly, the site contains evidence of the earliest known use of fire by human ancestors, dated to about 1.0 million years old. Younger deposits at the site sample the Middle Stone Age archaeological traces of early Homo sapiens.

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